Tag Archives: gratitude

Season’s Greatings

Season Greeting

December 24th, 2015

A great deal, all positive, has been taking place at the Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute (ACEI).  2015 was yet another productive year for ACEI. We celebrated our 21st birthday and introduced our 7 business standard processing time; the fastest in the country. We also rolled out a monthly webinar series on topics related to Diploma Mills, the Future of Higher Education and Emergence of Online Education, as well as country specific updates. Please sign up here so you can stay abreast of upcoming webinars.

We demonstrated our commitment to the field of international education through our participation and attendance at various regional and national conferences such as AACRAO, NAFSA, AIEA, NAGAP, and SHRM, as session presenters and exhibitors showcasing our various services.  In addition, we continued our contribution to the field on topics related to international education and world cultures through our weekly blog “Academic Exchange,” and our monthly newsletter, “The Report.” As proud Charter and Endorsed Members of the Association of International Credential Evaluators, we have been actively involved in the Association’s monthly Credential Forums and helping organize its first Annual Symposium on Standards to be held on March 23-24, 2015 in Phoenix, AZ.

As we prepare to wrap up 2015 and head home to our families for the holidays, we wanted to share a few fun facts on Christmas. We all know that Christmas is a Christian holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. There are also several Christmas traditions that are not related to Jesus but have been adopted and included in the celebration. We’d like to share with you this video from The Business Insider that provides a list of five of the biggest traditions. Please click the link below:

The most popular Christmas traditions have nothing to do with Jesus

Thank you for following our blog in 2015. We look forward to providing you with more fun, thought provoking and insightful posts in 2016.

Have a Happy and Wonderful Holiday Season!

Our best,

The Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute Team

 

 
ACEI Logo with Slogan - FINAL

The Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute, Inc. (ACEI), was founded in 1994 and is based in Los Angeles, CA, USA. ACEI provides a number of services that include evaluations of international academic credentials for U.S. educational equivalence, translation, verification, and professional training programs. ACEI is a Charter and Endorsed Member of the Association of International Credential Evaluators. For more information, visit www.acei-global.org.

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Messages of Thanks on this Thanksgiving Holiday

11/26/15

Thanksgiving_2015

Thanksgiving is a special time to be thankful for great families, fortunate events, caring friends, amazing communities, and all the gifts of life we’re all lucky to have. At ACEI, we’re especially thankful for all the wonderful friends, coworkers, customers, clients, and readers like you.

We have invited members of the ACEI team to share with you their personal messages of thanks.

Brian Aguilar (Administrative Assistant): This year (like every year) has been an emotional roller-coaster. I’m thankful for all the changes, which at first seem scary, but always have great outcomes. I’m thankful for all the adventures, the rough patches, the ups and downs — that have contributed to my personal development. I’m thankful for all the new people that have come in to my life, and for those that continue to be a part of it. I’m thankful for all the words of wisdom, the support, and the love I receive from everyone around me each and every day.

Mary Baxton (Senior Credential Evaluator): Now retired (from CSUN), I reflect on my career in higher/ international education and cutting my teeth on credential evaluations.  It is a passion eagerly continued thanks to working with the ACEI team.

Scott Brown (Client Relations Officer): This has been good year and I’m thankful for good health, my friends and family and for being a part of ACEI. It is a joy corresponding with our international applicants and I wish you all a very happy Thanksgiving!

Sanjin Gacina (Senior Credential Evaluator): I am thankful to be part of the ACEI family and to be surrounded by a special group of exceptional people. I am also thankful for the good fortune of a peaceful and free existence.

Clayton Johans-Winston (Client Relations Officer): I am so thankful and grateful to have been working for this incredible company, ACEI.

Katherine Kang (Senior Credential Evaluator): I am thankful for having my family with me. My son’s birthday is near Thanksgiving and due to his father’s career, he wasn’t able to celebrate with us every year. This year, all three of us were together!

Nora S. Khachetourians (Director: Evaluation & Translation Departments): There are so many things to be thankful about: a wonderful family, loving grandchildren, good health and keeping busy with work and people I love at ACEI.

Alex Martinez (Client Relations Officer): I am grateful for spending another year with my family, good health and wish for world peace and love.

Yolinisse Moreno (Director of Communications): This year and every year I am very thankful for my wonderful family, friends and colleagues. I feel very blessed to be surrounded by these people and have a roof over my head. Let’s all remember to always be kind to one another. Our kindness can change the world. Happy Thanksgiving!

John Riley (Social Media Marketing): I’m thankful for my beautiful wife, my health and the wonderful friends and family in my life.

Jasmin Saidi-Kuehnert (President & CEO): Though the new year started with the loss of a loved one, my father, it goes without saying that I’m thankful for all life’s goodness, my wonderful husband, my family and friends near and far, and my amazing “work family” here at ACEI. I feel very lucky to be in the company of dedicated and talented individuals who each bring with them their unique skills and life experiences.

Alan Saidi (Senior Vice President & COO): I am thankful for all the loved ones in my life, my two beautiful daughters and loving wife and for the beauty which is all around me. My sincere gratitude also goes to my mother and sister and everyone at ACEI.

William Thompson (Administrative Assistant): I’m thankful for this year and for working with ACEI which I view as my second family. Thank you and Happy Thanksgiving!

We wish you the happiest of Thanksgivings and hope you enjoy this great holiday season!

Now, it’s your turn, what are you thankful for?

(A shout out to Jennifer Hutnich, one of our senior credential evaluators and Sal Sarhangi, our IT Manager, who were away at the time of this blog’s posting and unable to contribute. We send a big thanks to both Jennifer and Sal!)

ACEI Logo with Slogan - FINAL

The Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute, Inc. (ACEI), was founded in 1994 and is based in Los Angeles, CA, USA. ACEI provides a number of services that include evaluations of international academic credentials for U.S. educational equivalence, translation, verification, and professional training programs. ACEI is a Charter and Endorsed Member of the Association of International Credential Evaluators. For more information, visit www.acei-global.org.

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Happy Holidays!

December 21, 2012

holiday

To all our readers, 

Thank you for following our

blog and investing your time

and readership in us. We are

grateful to all of you who

make up the loyal community

of readers to whom we are

connected.

Thank you for joining the

discussion. We appreciate

your support and your

thoughtful comments.

We are so grateful for the

writers who have guest

blogged for us and their

interesting, educational and

thought provoking

contributions. 

We look forward to 2013 and

continuing the discussion and

exchange of ideas.

 

From all of us at ACEI ,

we wish you a Happy Holiday

and Successful New Year!

 

Academic Credentials Evaluation

Institute, Inc.

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Reflection, Renewal, and Red Underwear

December 20, 2012

2012 Calendar

At the close of this year—at least in the Gregorian calendar— which is celebrated in Europe and in the Americas, I find myself reflecting on what entering a New Year means to people around the world. As I am at the end of my first year living abroad, the differences and similarities are foremost on my mind. Of course moving from sunny Southern California to a rainy North Germany has its noticeable differences. And, as we all know, climate affects our general outlook on life as well as our daily routines, and life rituals. I can now personally attest to the fact that sunnier climes create sunnier dispositions, and a general sense of optimism, which is less understood, in colder more northern parts of the world.

But what really makes it all so interesting is the fact that both places have fairly large immigrant populations, which bring their own cultural ideals, ways of life, and ritual celebrations into daily life. Everyone finds the time, once a year to celebrate the coming new year, and ritualize the “out with the old in with the new” which is historically so important, vital in fact, to cultures all over the world.

New Year celebrations were originally based upon harvest celebrations, which were informed by cycles of the sun, the moon and the movement of stars. There is a difference though, between the “civil” calendars adopted by countries and the religious calendars, which are followed by people all over the world, though they often exist and are celebrated side by side.

The Julian Calendar (a reformation of the Roman Calendar by Julius Cesar in 46 BCE) was intended to approximate the Sun’s cycle as it returns to the same position each year, in other words from vernal equinox to vernal equinox. The Berber people of North Africa still use this calendar, as do most Eastern Orthodox Churches.

As the Julian calendar is slightly inaccurate (it gained about 3 days every four centuries,) it was later replaced by the Gregorian calendar, (The Christian Calendar) in 1582, in order to have a fixed date for the Spring Equinox, to which the celebration of Easter is attached. It is now the more internationally, widely accepted civil calendar. However, Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Iran, Nepal, and Saudi Arabia do not adopt the Gregorian calendar as their civil calendar. Many other countries use their own calendars alongside the Gregorian calendar, such as: Bangladesh, Burma, India, and Israel. Then there are those that use a modified version of the Gregorian calendar: Cambodia, Japan, North Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Taiwan.

The date of the Islamic New Year is determined by the visibility of the hilal, or the waxing crescent moon following a new moon and may vary according to location. The day that marks the beginning of the New Year in the Islamic Calendar is called Hijra. While Muslims do not “celebrate” the beginning of the year, they do acknowledge the passing of time, by reflecting on how they have led their lives and on their own mortality. It is very similar to the Jewish ritual of their New Year, Rosh Hashanah.

Nowruz (New Day), the Iranian and Zoroastrian New Year’s Day is celebrated on March 21stthe Spring Equinox. It is celebrated as a theme of renewal, personal renewal and that of the home and friendships. It is also celebrated as a secular cultural festival in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Kashmir, Azerbaijan, as well as the Kurdistan regions of Iran, Turkey, Iraq, Armenia, Syria, and Georgia.

What do all of these human constructs of time; religious or civil have in common then? Plenty. People all over the world celebrate and ritualize the passage of time. Whether their New Year falls in February, March, April, September or November, or December, most cultures see this as a time of introspection and reflection, a time of rebirth— an illumination of the soul. It is a chance to be cleansed of the old sins of the previous year and celebrate the potential of hope for a healthier, happier, and prosperous coming year.

Saint Sylvester

It was not until I moved to Germany that I first heard New Years referred to as Sylvester. I felt silly asking but I did, and found out that it is celebrated as Saint Sylvester’s Eve after Pope Sylvester I, who died in 335 and was reported to have miraculously cured the Emperor Constantine of leprosy. Since that time of “miraculous healing” New Years was traditionally called St. Sylvester’s Eve in predominantly Catholic countries such as France, Germany, Italy and Poland. Even in Israel where so many European immigrants landed, Israelis celebrate the civic holiday of New Years as Sylvester Nacht—who knew?

Fire

Fire, fireworks, and light are ritually used for dispelling evil spirits and marking the time of transition from darkness to light as we move away from the Winter Solstice. Even countries whose religious beliefs are not connected to the Gregorian calendar, often celebrate the civil New Year with fireworks, such as: Morocco, China, India, Malaysia, and Thailand.

Those that celebrate their new years at other times also use the element of fire as a cleansing, to mark this passage and burn away the previous years’ evils and sins and scare off any spirits that may wish to take up residence in the coming year.

In Iran and those following the Persian ritual passed down since ancient Zoroastrian times, the Persian New Year celebrations begins with the festival called Chahar-Shanbeh Souri, which literally means “Eve of Wednesday” because it is always held on the last Tuesday of winter, just before the Vernal Equinox or first moment of spring. The fire ceremony symbolizes the changing of seasons and rebirth. The tradition includes people going into the streets and alleys to make bonfires, and jump over them while singing the traditional song Zardi-ye man az to, sorkhi-ye to az man. This literally translates to “My yellowness is yours, your redness is mine,” with the figurative message “My paleness (pain, sickness) for you (the fire), your strength (health) for me.” The fire is believed to burn out all the fear (yellowness) in their subconscious or their spirit, in preparation for New Year.

Diwali, Festival of Lights, is a five day Hindu festival which falls between Mid-October and mid-November. Small clay lamps are filled with oil and lit to signify the triumph of good over evil, and firecrackers are ignited to drive away evil spirits.

In Mongolia, the Lunar New Year is known as Tsagaan Sar. It is celebrated in February, and candles are used on altars to symbolize enlightenment.

In Mexico the tradition of making lists of all the bad or unfortunate events of the past years are written down and thrown into a fire before midnight to remove any negative energy from carrying over into the New Year.

In Ecuador men dress up as women to represent the “widow” of the year that has passed and then create life-size dummies which are burnt at midnight to “burn away” the years past misfortunes.

Tibetans also celebrate Losar in February, and traditionally go out into nature to perform rituals of gratitude by making offerings to the water spirits and smoke offerings to local spirits of the natural world.

Water

The Chinese New Year is known s Spring Festival and marks the end of winter, as families gather for a reunion dinner or Chúxi, which translates into “Remove Evening” or “Eve of the Passing Year.” Every family thoroughly cleans the house, sweeping away ill-fortune, cleansing it of evil omens from the previous year and making room for a new year filled with good luck.

Laotian people celebrate their Pbeemai April 13-15 by cleansing their homes and villages with perfumed water and flowers. The Burmese celebrate Thingyan April 13-16 with water as a means of washing away the sins of the pervious year. Water throwing and public dousing is rampant on the streets for days. In Nepal Fagu is celebrated on the full moon day in February by spraying colored water, and throwing water balloons at each other.

In Thailand the Songkran festival is celebrated from 13-15 April, by the throwing of water. However they can— jars, pots, water guns, are used as a means of washing all of the bad away, even spraying total strangers on the street. Of course we have to remember that in April temperatures can get up to 40C. In traditional celebrations, it is believed that good luck and prosperity for the coming year may be obtained by pouring water filled with fragrant herbs over the Buddhas on household shrines as well as at monasteries. This water is considered blessed and is then used to give good fortune to elders and family members by pouring it on their shoulders.

Red Underwear, Grapes, and Lentils

Believe it or not, another common link in New Year’s celebrations is the wearing of red underwear. Italians, Spanish, and Venezuelans all wear red underwear on New Years for good luck and love, though only the women in Mexico wear red underwear for finding love.

The Spanish, Mexicans, Chileans, Costa Ricans, Brazilians and Guatemalans all eat 12 grapes for each chime of the clock at midnight, making a wish for the New Year with each one.

Lentils seem to represent money and prosperity because of their round “coin” shape and are traditionally eaten by Brazilians, Hungarians, Chileans, and Italians. The Italians who seem to go lentil crazy— have lentils at dinner before midnight then take one spoonful of lentil stew per bell as the bells toll midnight.

So as 2012 comes to a close here in Germany, I will be celebrating Sylvestre and honoring the spirit of the transition from darkness into light, and wishing for a global time of renewal, hope and joy.

Jeannie Winston Nogai
Owner / Winston Nogai Design
www.jeanniewinston.com / E: jwndesign@me.com

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Happy Thanksgiving 2012

November 21, 2012

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Comments to our blog “Travel: The Bridge to Friendship.”

November 05, 2012

Gratitude - This Dawn #8

We received a few comments on our Facebook page about our recent blog “Travel: The Bridge to Friendship” (11/01/12) which we’d like to share with you. Please feel free to comment on our blog page and share our posts. Thank you.

“Let me first start by saying how much I love your blogs Jasmin. This one is so exotic and fabulous!! And I love that you had your ears pierced by a Farsi-speaking English nurse on safari in Africa. I grew up in Israel my family is Romanian, but was exposed to so many fascinating other cultures, Like: Bulgarian, Moroccan, Turkish ,Farsi, Yemen, Arab Polish and so on and so on. Tried so many different foods and music, movies. I love learning about other cultures. Can you imagine someone’s world that is not willing to be exposed to so many amazing new things, and only their culture matters? I can’t! We all are so different, but like you said, so much alike. Love your stories about traveling and love, love, love this blog!”
~Zissy Rosen (Los Angeles, CA)

“I love your blog. I call myself a global nomad.”
~Patricia Mlatac (Cape Town, S. Africa)

“Lovely article. I now wish I’d sent my boys to boarding schools also. I really didn’t appreciate the experience at the time, but I do now. One hears so many horror stories from kids who had bad experiences with authority figures during childhood that one can become unduly wary. Keep up the good work.”
~Jabin Jalil

“I think travel does broaden the horizens (sic.) but I would never send my children to boarding school – I think children should be with their families and travel with them until they are older and can travel alone. I liked my time at CTS but as the years pass it is easy to remember the nice things and forget the homesickness and being away from family and friends – there were many unhappy girls there just desparate (sic.) to go home – just saying!”
~Elaine Erskine

“Nice blog post – enjoyed reading it. Funny the stories we take for granted as parts of our childhood are actually quite exotic and interesting! Hey, I love soaptopia too!’
~Bianca Bagatourian (Los Angeles, CA)

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What is Memorial Day?

May 24th 2012

Like This!

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